Essays On One Child Policy

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My dissertation focuses on the macroeconomic consequences of China's one-child policy. The first chapter examines the effects of China's one-child policy on savings and foreign reserve accumulation. Fertility control increases the saving rate both by altering saving decisions at the household level, and by altering the demographic composition of the population at the aggregate level. As in Song, Storesletten and Zilibotti (2011), government-owned firms are assumed to be less productive but have better access to the credit market compare to entrepreneurial firms. As labor switches from less productive to more productive firms, demand for domestic bank borrowing decreases. As saving increases while demand for loans decreases, domestic savings are invested abroad, generating a foreign surplus. In the second chapter of my dissertation, I provide a theoretical framework for examining the effects of China's one-child policy on its long run economic growth. The model incorporates within family intergenerational transfers and a "quantity/quality" tradeoff. When a population control policy is implemented, parents increase investment in their children's education in order to compensate for reduction in future transfers. As in Galor and Weil (2010), technological progress is assumed to be driven by two forces: the population size and the level of education. With population control, the total population decreases and the average level of education increases. Thus, the overall effect on technological progress is ambiguous without specifying functional forms for technology and human capital. The third chapter provides a quantitative exploration of the model from the second chapter. The calibrated results are consistent with the model, in which population, technological progress, and income per capita move in endogenous cycles. The impact of China's one-child policy depends on the timing of the policy. If the policy is enforced when the population is large enough, hence when the rate of technological progress is high, it increases GDP growth both in the short-run and in the long-run.

The Effects of the One-Child Policy in China Essay example

808 Words4 Pages

Would it be fair for the Government to control how many children you have? Is it fair for them to kill your unborn children? Since 1949 under the rule of Mao Zedong, the communist Chinese government had enforced policies that control families and couples in China. The Government has forced the people to have more children at one point and less at another. The One-Child policy in China limits Chinese couples to one child each. The three exceptions to the policy are: Minority ethnic groups, urban single-child residents, and the policy only enforced on the Han Chinese. The one-child policy was a bad idea for China for three reasons: punishments (inequality), unfair treatment of women, and china’s fertility rate was already decreasing…show more content…

Would it be fair for the Government to control how many children you have? Is it fair for them to kill your unborn children? Since 1949 under the rule of Mao Zedong, the communist Chinese government had enforced policies that control families and couples in China. The Government has forced the people to have more children at one point and less at another. The One-Child policy in China limits Chinese couples to one child each. The three exceptions to the policy are: Minority ethnic groups, urban single-child residents, and the policy only enforced on the Han Chinese. The one-child policy was a bad idea for China for three reasons: punishments (inequality), unfair treatment of women, and china’s fertility rate was already decreasing (unnecessary).
One reason that one-child was a bad idea is because if parent under the one-child policy has another child illegally, the government would force abortion, sterilization, fines, or adoption on the couple. Also not all couples were penalized like others, making this policy unfair. “In some places couples who have broken the one-child policy have had to pay large fines, or been punished with forced sterilization and abortions.” “In other places, couples covered by the policy have two or even three children without paying any penalties.” (Background essay) “Couples can be fined thousands of dollars for having an (extra) child without a permit, and reports of forced abortions or sterilization are common.” (Document E) This evidence

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